VIRTUAL SESSIONS | LIVE | 2020-2021 MNI KI WAKAN
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mni ki
wakan
INDIGENOUS
WATER
DECADE
2020-2021 VIRTUAL SESSIONS | LIVE
MNI KI WAKAN
INDIGENOUS
WATER
DECADE
WELCOME TO MNI KI WAKAN

MNI KI WAKAN
2020-2021

VIRTUAL INDIGENOUS WATER DECADE
Mni Ki Wakan will host ongoing virtual sessions on the provisional agenda below from 2020-2021.

Virtual Sessions

Indigenous Knowledge

Indigenous Water Justice

Indigenous Water Governance

Water Infrastructure

Indigenous Innovations
Indigenous Water Justice

Indigenous Water Justice

By Dr. Kelsey Leonard, Shinnecock Indian Nation, Indigenous Water Scholar, at Mni Ki Wakan 2019.
Indigenous Water Justice, Governance, & Sustainability

Indigenous Water Justice, Governance, & Sustainability

By Dr. Kelsey Leonard
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Mni Ki Wakan, a "Promising Solution"

Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States
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Join the work of Mni Ki Wakan

Partner, collaborate, & volunteer
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Indigenous Youth Leading the Future of Water

INDIGENOUS WATER JUSTICE

Today, the global community is increasingly experiencing water scarcity issues. 2.3 billion people live in water stressed countries according to the United Nations, and it is projected that about 4.8-5.7 billion people will experience water scarcity issues by 2050 (UN). As rising sea levels, droughts, and depleted rivers present new threats, the global water crisis is exacerbated by global warming, climate change; unsustainable consumption, agricultural use, privatization, and industry.

In the United States, 1 in 10 American Indians lack access to safe tap water & basic sanitation. For every 1,000 Indigenous Peoples, 58 do not have access to indoor plumbing (Closing the Water Access Gap in the United States, 2019). Indigenous Peoples are often the first to experience water access, lack of clean drinking water, and equity issues. While many Indigenous Nations are negatively impacted by unsustainable infrastructure projects, extractive industries, and increasing water contamination.

Prior to the advent of water colonialism, many Indigenous Peoples believed that water is sacred, the source of life, Indigenous knowledge systems, and cultural practices that have protected the natural world for centuries, still. Today, Indigenous Peoples are innovating. This includes granting legal personality to rivers, advocating against destructive corporate projects, developing Indigenous-led water projects, providing Indigenous infrastructure, and honoring the sacredness of water through a myriad of other innovations. Dismantling water colonialism and restoring Indigenous water ethics that nourish all life and future generations is at the heart of this work.

From the global to local level, Indigenous water justice is connected by all Indigenous Peoples, youth, organizations, movements, and diverse communities responding to the call to defend against all water issues through a myriad of innovations and transformations. Mni Ki Wakan arose in response to the call for water justice, Indigenous water rights, and governance.
Sponsor delegates from your region to the 2022 Mni Ki Wakan.

Sponsor delegates from your region to the 2022 Mni Ki Wakan.

175000000
There are 175 million indigenous peoples in the world.
5000
5,000 of the world's 7,000 languages are indigenous peoples' languages.

Water Access

For every 1,000 Indigenous Peoples, 58 do not have access to indoor plumbing

1 in 10

American Indians in the United States lack access to safe tap water & basic sanitation

1 in 6

American Indians do not have access to clean drinking water.
70
percent of watersheds since the 19th century have been lost. The number continues to rise. Watersheds are critical for clean water and biodiversity.

Global Warming

Wherever Indigenous Peoples' land rights are secured, there are higher carbon storage rates, and lower rates of deforestation.

INTERNATIONAL SUPPORTERS

Mni Ki Wakan: Following the Sacred Current of Water. Upstream
Thinking. A Confluence of Indigenous Tributaries.

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INDIGENOUS WATER ASSEMBLY

MEET OUR MEMBERS
The indigenous water assembly is dedicated to the respect and protection of water. Members are from diverse regions of the world community and carry out diverse areas of water governance centering indigenous knowledge.

Indigenous Water Governance

Indigenous Water Resource & Research Database
Help build the Mni Ki Wakan resource database. Increase access to indigenous water approaches, tools, videos, and resources.
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